Amvrosia

In the ancient Greek myths, amvrosia (/æmˈbrʒə/, Greek: ἀμβροσία, “immortality”) is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it. It was brought to the gods in Olympus by doves.

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Morpheas

Morpheas has the ability to mimic any human form and appear in dreams. His true semblance is that of a winged daemon, an imagery shared with many of his siblings. Robert Burton, in his 1621 Anatomy of Melancholy, refers to Classical depictions of Morpheas, saying “Philostaratus paints [Morpheus] in a white and black coat, with a horn and ivory box full of dreams, of the same colours, to signify good and bad”.

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Nektar

Nektar in Greek mythology along with ambrosia was the drink and food that was consumed by the twelve gods of Olympus, meaning that they acquired their immortality and strength by them. As the etymology of the word is immortality, that is, the opposite of death. Nectar is the juice of flowers which is sugar-rich, while the same name refers to the juice that bees gather from flowers and which, after appropriate treatment by them.

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Symposio

In ancient Greece, the symposium (Greek: symposion or symposio, from sympinein, “to drink together”) was a widespread custom. A gathering of friends, or a party as we would say today. In some of them, the participants contributed either financially, or with food, called “contributions”. The Homer calls them “feasts,” while the original relative phrases “after contributions,” or “dinner from baskets” are known..

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